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FAQ


Question & Answers

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Q: What does U=U really mean?


A: U=U means "Undetectable = Untransmittable," indicating that if an HIV-positive person is on HIV meds (antiretroviral therapy, or ART) with a consistently undetectable HIV viral load, the HIV virus cannot be transmitted to a sex partner.

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Q: If you're a woman living with HIV is pregnancy completly completely out of the question?


A: Medications to treat HIV allow women with HIV to live longer, healthier lives and deliver healthy, HIV-negative babies.


Q: I am already taking HIV medicines and I want to get pregnant. Do I need to switch my medicines?


A: If your HIV medicines are working and you have an undetectable viral load, you don't usually need to switch when planning for a pregnancy. However, there are a few HIV medications that your clinician may want you to avoid.

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Q: Is pregnancy completly completely out of the question for HIV positive women?


A: Medications to treat HIV allow women with HIV to live longer, healthier lives and deliver healthy, HIV-negative babies.


Q:Why can't I breastfeed my baby?


A: HIV can be passed through breast milk. If you breastfeed your child, you run the risk of your baby getting HIV. If you would like more information on the possible risks and benefits of breastfeeding, consult with a pediatrician or obstetrician who is an expert in HIV infection, ideally before delivery.

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Q: Can I get HIV through oral sex?


A: The risk of getting HIV through receiving oral sex (that is, a partner's mouth on your genitals) is very, very low. We can't say that there's zero risk.


Q: What are the risks of getting HIV if you put on a condom after you've already started having sex?


A: Condoms work well to prevent HIV infection when one partner is HIV infected and the other isn't. Studies show that HIV-uninfected partners are 80% less likely to become infected, if they use condoms properly and consistently, compared with those who do not.

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